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Native American Studies Courses offered at NICC

NAS 101 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (3)

This course examines major issues facing Native Americans today. Focus will be on the analysis of issues in light of tribal efforts toward self-determination.

NAS 103 CULTURES & PEOPLES OF NATIVE AMERICA (3)

This is a survey of the archeology, languages, religions, technologies, achievements and cultural developments of native North American people from their earliest history in the Americas to the present. This course closely examines social and cultural change issues.

NAS 104 NATIVE AMERICAN ARTS (3)

This course provides an examination and comparative study of Native American art forms including historic, traditional and contemporary forms. Also offered as ART 101.

NAS 110 OMAHA LANGUAGE I (4)

This is a beginning course, which will introduce students to the basic structure, grammar and phonetics of the Omaha language. Also discussion of Omaha cultural tradition.

NAS 111 OMAHA LANGUAGE II (4)

This is a continuation of the Omaha I, with more intense development of vocabulary and grammar. Continues discussion of Omaha cultural traditions. Prerequisite: NAS 110 or permission of instructor.

NAS 120 DAKOTA LANGUAGE I (4)

This is a beginning course, which will introduce students to the basic structure, grammar and phonetics of the Dakota language. Also discussion of Dakota cultural tradition

NAS 121 DAKOTA LANGUAGE II (4)

This is a continuation of Dakota I, with more intense development of vocabulary and grammar. Continues discussion of Dakota cultural traditions. Prerequisite: NAS 120 or permission of instructor.

NAS 130 NATIVE AMERICAN MUSIC (3)

This course is a study of contemporary and traditional tribal specific music. Emphasis will be placed on particular types of songs and their significance in tribal history.

NAS 155 NATIVE AMERICAN MYTHOLOGY (3)

This is a study of the mythology of Native Americans: origins, symbolism and tribal variations. The oral tradition in creation, trickster, and hero stories of indigenous people is emphasized.

NAS 200 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1890 (3)

his is a study of events, personalities and trends in Native American history to 1890. The interaction between native peoples and European colonists and immigrants is closely examined.

NAS 201 NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1890 (3)

This course is a comprehensive study of Native Americans since 1890. Trends in U.S. policy and Native movements to regain new forms of sovereignty are examined.

NAS 202 SANTEE DAKOTA TRIBAL HISTORY (3)

This is a study of tribal history up to and including the present based on materials from government archives, agency and tribal records as well as from more traditional community sources.

NAS 203 PONCA TRIBAL HISTORY (3)

This course examines Ponca history including the forced move to Indian Territory and the perilous return to their homelands in Nebraska.

NAS 204 OMAHA TRIBAL HISTORY (3)

This course is a study of the Omaha people and the events which have led to contemporary political and economic conditions. Content is based on materials from government archives, agency and tribal records as well as from more traditional community sources.

NAS 205 NATIVE AMERICAN SPIRITUALITY (3)

This course is a comparative introduction the worldviews, ritual practices, and spirituality of Native Americans. Course will examine traditional tribal religions, syncretism and revitalization movements prompted by contact with European-Americans (such as the Ghost Dance and Native American Church) and distinctive American Indian forms of Christianity.

NAS 206 ORAL HISTORY IN TRIBAL TRADITION (3)

Students will collect various kinds of material (video, audio, written) from local people then organize and formulate the collected material into a cohesive whole for use by oral historians, researchers and future classes. This course prepares students to do fieldwork on their own.

NAS 207 Native American Genealogy Research (3)

This is a course in which students will learn about the genealogy to Native American Indian history, culture, and family. Students of any ancestry or background will gain value in learning about a central aspect of Native American culture, and in doing research that is geared toward either their own family genealogy or the researching of the genealogies of public figures, or historical figures. Students will be guided through a research process and set of research methodologies for vital statistics, land, tax, census, historical material and online resources. Students will also learn family genealogies of their descendants. By completion of the semester, students will be expected to assemble a genealogy and family history.

NAS 210 GRANT WRITING IN TRIBAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

This course introduces the student to the process of fathering information and writing that is essential for successful grant proposal writing. Students will become acquainted with the expectations that many grant sources communicate through “requests for proposals” (RFPs).

NAS 211 GRANT WRITING IN TRIBAL DEVELOPMENT II (3)

Grant Writing for Tribal Development II gives students the opportunity to write “real” grants using skills and knowledge gained from NAS 210. Students should be computer literate and able to navigate successfully on-line. Students will be required to locate, download, print and be prepared to “submit” completed grant in class. Pre-requisite: NAS 210 Grant Writing in Tribal Development I. Recommended: CA 104 Intro to Computers

NAS 212 NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATION (3)

An overview of traditional education practices as well as early missionary and Federal schooling efforts. Major legislation and contemporary trends will be addressed.

NAS 213 TRIBAL GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (3)

This course will review the history of traditional forms of Native American self-government as well as the development of contemporary forms including a close look at the Indian Reorganization Act and tribal constitutions. (Satisfies Gen. Ed. requirement)

NAS 215 FEDERAL INDIAN POLICY (3)

An examination of the development of U.S. Government policies toward and about Native Americans and a study of the philosophies behind the policies. A close look at the impact of those policies is central to the reading and discussion of this course.

NAS 216 FEDERAL INDIAN LAW (4)

This course provides a brief overview of Indian policy as a background to the field of Indian law, studies various components of Indian law, such as civil and criminal jurisdiction, treaty rights, federal trust responsibility, tribal judicial systems, tribal sovereignty, taxation and regulation, freedom of religion and Indian Child Welfare Act. Experience in reading cases and statutes is helpful.

NAS 220 TRIBAL MANAGEMENT (3)

A look at the ways in which managerial styles affect and enhance the development of both the organization and the workers supervised. Issues of financial management unique to tribal organizations are also studied. Contemporary theories, principles and practices of management and supervisions relevant to tribal organizations will be presented.

NAS 222 DAKOTA CULTURE AND TRADITION (3)

This course serves as an examination of the traditional culture of the Santee Dakota people in the context of the larger Oyate (Nation) of the Seven Council Fires. Prerequisite: NAS 120 or permission of instructor.

NAS 244 OMAHA CULTURE AND TRADITION (3)

This course serves as an examination of the traditional culture of the Omaha people in the context of the historic and contemporary life of the Omaha Nation.

NAS 245 NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE (3)

The study of literary forms utilized by Native American authors. Emphasis will be placed upon the writers' points of view, the structure of their literary techniques, and the contribution of Native American writers to American Literature.

NAS 250 NATIVE AMERICAN PERSPECTIVES IN PHILOSOPHY (3)

Course examines the traditional understanding of various Native American peoples. Includes comparisons of traditional tribal cultural understandings regarding origin and nature of the world, values and ways of life.

NAS 251 DAKOTA LANGUAGE III

This course will continue to focus on the development of conversational skills in the Dakota language. Students will continue to develop and strengthen pronunciation skills and an understanding of the structure of the language while increasing Dakota vocabulary. Students will develop and strengthen reading and writing skills in Dakota. Translation of text and documents as well as public speaking skills will be introduced to students. Prerequisites: NAS 120 & 121 or equivalent experience.

NAS 252 DAKOTA LANGUAGE IV

Use of advanced grammatical patterns and conversational skills in the Dakota language are emphasized with a focus on conversational fluency. Increasingly complex vocabulary items and contextual use of language are examined. Prerequisites: NAS 251 or equivalent experience.

NAS 253 OMAHA LANGUAGE III

This course will continue to focus on the development of conversational skills in the Omaha language. Students will continue to develop and strengthen pronunciation skills and an understanding of the structure of the language while increasing vocabulary. Students will develop and strengthen reading and writing skills in Omaha. Translation of text and documents as well as public speaking skills will be introduced to students. Prerequisites: NAS 110 & 111 or equivalent experience.

NAS 254 OMAHA LANGUAGE IV

Use of advanced grammatical patterns and conversational skills in the Omaha language are emphasized with a focus on conversational fluency. Increasingly complex vocabulary items and contextual use of language are examined. Prerequisites: NAS 253 or equivalent experience.

NAS 260 NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN (3)

Examines the social relationships with women and men, cultural values, changes, traditions, expectations, leadership and family roles of Native American women. Historic and contemporary issues will be the focus.

NAS 270 NATIVE AMERICAN MEN (3)

The roles available to Native American men have changed in recent generations. In many tribal communities men are re-examining their roles as relatives and members of families, cultural and economic leaders, artists and poets. This course will explore many of the roles, options and realities.

NAS 280 ISSUES IN NATIVE AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGY (3)

An introduction to the understanding of Native American psychology. Issues of cultural identity, gender roles and expectations, the impact of Euro-American colonialism, the impact of the boarding school system, family violence, and changes in parenting styles and values and chemical dependency will be examined. A collection of relevant readings that apply to these issues will serve as the texts for this focused study.

NAS 290 SPECIAL TOPICS (1-3)

COURSE DESCRIPTION COMING SOON!

NAS 299 INTERNSHIP/PRACTICUM (3)

COURSE DESCRIPTION COMING SOON!

NAS 310 OMAHA COMPOSITION (3)

This course strengthens reading and writing skills in Umonhon with an emphasis on composition. Students are guided and encouraged to create written works in a variety of genres for a variety of situations. Prerequisites: NAS110, NAS111.

NAS 311 DAKOTA LANGUAGE V (3)

This course continues to strength the functional vocabulary of the Dakota language. In addition, public speaking skills will be introduced for the occasional situation which involves speaking in a group context or at special events. Terms regarding spirituality are included. Prerequisites: NAS252.

NAS 320 OMAHA LITERATURE (3)

The study of literary forms created by Umonhon authors in Umonhon. Higa (Sacred stories), letters, stories, battle records, and personal accounts which have been recorded in Umonhon will be explored. Consideration of both oral and written tradition and the interplay of the two will be considered. The reflection of Umonhon values, perspective, and world view, as reflected in the literature, will be underscored. Prerequisites: NAS110, NAS111.

NAS 321 DAKOTA LANGUAGE VI (3)

This course enhances students’ ability in speaking the Dakota language. Also, students will be advancing their skills in written translations. Transcripts of traditional stories and historical writings will be focused upon. Prerequisite: NAS311.

NAS 330 OMAHA PUBLIC SPEAKING (3)

This course is a study of the methods and techniques of addressing the public in Omaha with emphasis on style and manner of presentation. The course will be useful to the individual who much give an infrequent speech to the public, or the individual who must address the public on a professional basis. Prerequisites: NAS110, NAS111.

NAS 410 STRUCTURE OF DAKOTA (3)

Analysis of the grammatical structure of the Dakota language, including pronouns, gender, parts of speech, and sentence structure. Prerequisites: NAS 120 & NAS 121 or instructor permission.

NAS 411 DAKOTA LANGUAGE VII (3)

Students will focus on strengthening oral and written fluency at an advanced level. This course will be essential for those who will teach the Dakota language. Prerequisite: NAS 321.

NAS 415 OMAHA COMPOSITION II (3)

This course advances reading and writing skills in Umonhon with an emphasis on composition. Students are guided and encouraged to create written works in a variety of genres for a variety of situations. Prerequisites: NAS110, NAS111, NAS310.

NAS 420 OMAHA LITERATURE II (3)

A continuation of the study of literary forms created by Umonhon authors in Umonhon. Higa (Sacred stories), letters, stories, and personal accounts which have been recorded in Umonhon will be explored. The interplay of oral and written tradition will be discussed. Creation of written versions of oral forms will be explored. The reflection of Umonhon values, perspective, and world view, as reflected in the literature, will be underscored. Prerequisites: NAS110, NAS111, 320.

NAS 421 DAKOTA LANGUAGE VIII (3)

Students will focus on strengthening oral and written fluency at an advanced level. Group discussion and public speaking skills will be enhanced. This course will be essential for those who will teach the Dakota language. Prerequisite: NAS 411.

NAS 485 APPLIED RESEARCH (3)

Tribal communities urgently need accurate, current, accessible and clear information; both quantitative and qualitative. This course will introduce students to several different ways of gathering useful information from and about tribal communities. Each student will be expected to complete a research project, either individually or collaboratively.